ARMSTRONG SIDDELEY LYNX IVC SEVEN CYLINDER RADIAL ENGINE

The South African Air Force Selected the Avro Tutor training bi-plane to replace the Avro Avian IVM as the new basic trainer. The Avro Tutor was power by the Armstrong Siddeley Lynx IVc seven-cylinder radial engine. The first two Avro Tutor aircraft were purchased and a further 49 were built under licence by the Aircraft and Artillery Depot from 1935.

BRISTOL JUPITER IXF ENGINE

The Jupiter was designed during World War I by Roy Fedden of Cosmos Engineering.  During the rapid downscaling of military spending after the war, Cosmos became bankrupt in 1920 and was eventually purchased by the Bristol Aeroplane Company on the strengths of the Jupiter design and the encouragement of the Air Ministry. 

CLERGET 9B ROTARY NINE CYLINDER ENGINE

The Clerget 9B was a nine-cylinder rotary aircraft engine of the World War I era and was designed by the Frenchman Pierre Clerget.  This engine was manufactured in both Great Britain (Gwynne Limited) and France and was used on such aircraft as the Sopwith Camel.

DE HAVILLAND GYPSY II FOUR CYLINDER IN-LINE AIR-COOLED ENGINE

The engine on display, serial number 2166 was originally fitted to the De Havilland DH-60G Gypsy Moth, registration number ZS-AJX that belonged to the Air Taxi Company.  This aircraft was impresses by the South African Air Force on 19 August 1940 and given the serial number 1432.

A-30 RA V-12 ENGINE FROM ITALIAN FIAT C.R.42 FIGHTER

Fiat C.R.42 first flew in 1933, with some 1 309 being built and was a refinement of the C.R.30 being much smaller and faster.  This aircraft proved to be an excellent biplane fighter, being fast, robust and nimble and armed with two 7.7mm machine guns mounted on the side of the cowling.  It was easily recognizable with its closely cowled engine, annular radiator beneath the propeller and Warren wing bracing and cockpit well behind the wing.  This aircraft performed very well during the Spanish Civil War on 1939 but unfortunately, Italy neglected to continue with further development of modern fighters.

JUNKERS JUMO 004B TURBOJET ENGINE

Development on the Jumo 004 Turbojet engine began in 1939 under the direction of Anselm Franz, whose experience with turbo compressors was built on the pioneering turbojet work of Hans von Ohain. The model 004A flew for the first time on 1942, but was not suitable for production because of its high weight, and large content of high-temperature alloys that were in short supply in Germany.  The 004B production model was easier to manufacture, weighed less and utilized air cooling of the combustor turbine blades, and exhaust nozzle.

The engines of the Buccaneer are started by means of high pressure air generated by the Palouste air starter powered by a Rolls-Royce Palouste jet engine. This engine idles at 25 000 rpm and runs at 35 000 rpm when delivering full power on aircraft engine start.  The Rolls-Royce Nimbus engine that powered the Westland Wasp helicopters formerly used by the SAAF was developed from the Palouste.

PRATT & WHITNEY R-1340-AN-1 ENGINE

The Pratt & Whitney R-1340 Wasp was an aircraft engine of the reciprocating type that was widely used in American aircraft from 1920 onwards.  It was the Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Company’s first engine and the first of the famed Wasp series of engines and featured a single-row, nine-cylinder, air-cooled engine of radial design.

PRATT & WHITNEY TWIN WASP R-2000-D5 FOURTEEN CYLINDER AIR-COOLED RADIAL ENGINE

In its original design the Twin Wasp (R-2000) D5 engine is a fourteen cylinder, radial, air-cooled type engine incorporating a single stage, two-speed integral supercharger built by Pratt & Whitney (Buick Motors) in 1942.  The Twin Wasp (R-2000) D engine was mainly built for the Douglas C-54 and DC-4-1009 Skymaster aircraft but was also used in the de Havilland Canada Caribou aircraft.  The DC-4 Skymaster 1009 was produced at the Douglas Aircraft Company plant at Santa Monica, California and was delivered to South African Airways on the 9th of August 1947.

ROLLS ROYCE AVON MK IC GAS TURBINE ENGINE

The engine on display entered production in 1950 and was on of Britain’s first successful axial flow gas turbine engines to see large scale production.  This powerful engine produces 6 500lbs (2 954kg) of static thrust and was used on a variety of aircraft including the Hawker Hunter used by the then Royal Rhodesian Air Force.

ROLLS-ROYCE EAGLE VIII LIQUID COOLED V-12 CYLINDER ENGINE

The Eagle VIII was the first aero engine designed by Rolls-Royce.  They used the 40/50 hp Silver Ghost engine as the basic platform for the new V-12 which was intended to provide a powerful and reliable liquid-cooled military aero engine which was not available in the UK at the outbreak of the First World War in August 1914.  Rolls-Royce initially produced a small batch of French Renault V-8 aero engines on the condition that this would be a trial project for the new engine.