AGS-17 PLAMYA (FLAME) 30MM AUTOMATIC GRENADE LAUNCHER (SOVIET UNION)

BACKGROUND HISTORY

Development of the AGS-17 (Avtomatischeskyi Granatmyot Stankovyi - Automatic Grenade launcher) was inspired by the Soviet-Chinese border clashes of late 1960s, as well as initial experience with several U.S. automatic grenade launchers. Based on information gained from North Vietnamese troops who were often on receiving end of these formidable weapons, the automatic grenade launcher was one of the most effective infantry support weapons to be used against typical Chinese and North Vietnamese Army "human wave" attacks.

DShK Heavy Machine-Gun (Soviet Union)

Designed by Kolesnikov, this mount consists of a detachable two-wheel base and three folding legs, which form the tail-boom for ground applications and are extended to form a tripod for AA applications.  Kolesnikov mounts were issued with heavy armored shields, but crews often discarded shields to save some weight and to decrease the gun profile when firing from wheels.

GSH-23L 23MM TWIN-BARREL CANNON

This weapon was introduced in 1965 and the designation GSH stands for Gryazev-Shipunov 23mm after its designers V. Gryazev and A. Shipunov.  Its works on the so-called "Gast" principle which was invented in Germany during the First World War by Karl Gast at the Vorwerk company (today one of the leading producers of vacuum cleaners in Germany).

UNITED STATES M3 GREASE GUN

The M3 submachine gun, also known as Grease gun, was developed as a cheaper war-time alternative to famous Thompson M1 and M1928 submachine guns.  The basic requirements were set by the US Ordnance Corps in February 1941.  The George Hyde and Frederick Sampson working together at Inland Division of General Motors Corporation developed a prototype which was designated as T20.  This was a very simple weapon,

FRENCH MAT-49 SUB-MACHINE GUN

The MAT-49 sub-machine gun was developed at the French state arms factory MAT (Manufacture Nationale d'Armes de Tulle) in the late 1940s, and was adopted by the Armee de Terre (French Army) in 1949.  The first batch of these weapons was delivered in 1950 and production of the MAT-49 continued at Tulle until mid-1960s after which it was transferred to the MAS factory at the St. Etienne.  The weapon accepted a 20 or 32 round box magazine and had an effective range of 100 metres.

SOVIET PKM 7,62 X 59R MACHINE GUN

By the early 1950s, requirements were fixed for a new general purpose machine gun (GPMG), firing 7.62x54R ammunition from belts and capable of firing from an integral bipod, an infantry tripod mount or a vehicle mount.  By 1956-7 a new design, the Nikitin general purpose machine gun became a favorite.  A batch of 500 of these weapons was ordered.  The slow production of this weapon spurred the Soviet Army General Artillery Department to order Mikhail Kalashnikov to build another machine gun to compete with the already established design.

PM WZ. 43/52 Sub-Machine Gun (Poland)

During the early 1950’s the army of the Polish People's Republic developed a modified version of the legendary Soviet PPS-43 Sudaeva (???-43) sub-machine gun that was developed by the Soviet designer Alexey Sudaevym in 1942.  It was produced under the name 7,62mm Pistolet Maszynowy WZ. 1943/52 and was given the designation Sub-machine gun PM WZ. 43/52 with wooden butt.  This modified version however retained the standard Soviet Union and Warsaw Pact 7.62 x 25mm caliber ammunition.

SOVIET RPD LIGHT MACHINE GUN

The RPD (Ruchnoy Pulemet Degtyarova - Degtyarov Light MG) was one of the first weapons designed to fire a new, intermediate 7.62 x 39mm cartridge.  The weapon was developed circa 1944 and was the standard squad automatic weapon of the Soviet army since the early 1950’s.  During the 1960s, this weapon was gradually phased out and replaced by the RPK light machine gun. 

SOVIET RPD LIGHT MACHINE GUN

The RPD (Ruchnoy Pulemet Degtyarova - Degtyarov Light MG) was one of the first weapons designed to fire a new, intermediate 7.62 x 39mm cartridge.  The weapon was developed circa 1944 and was the standard squad automatic weapon of the Soviet army since the early 1950’s.  During the 1960s, this weapon was gradually phased out and replaced by the RPK light machine gun.

RPG-75 SINGLE SHOT DISPOSABLE LIGHT ANTI-ARMOUR WEAPON (CZECHOSLOVAKIA)

The RPG-75 is a shoulder-fired, single shot disposable recoilless anti-tank weapon designed for destroying tanks and other armored objects up to a range of 300m.  The RPG-75 has the ability to penetrate 300 mm thick homogeneous armor.  The RPG-75 is made of an extruded light alloy telescopic tube.  The length of the launcher in the transport position is 630 mm and when extended to the firing position, measures 890mm.  This rocket launcher and is one of several designs reverse-engineered from the American M72 LAW (Light Anti-Tank Weapon) 66 mm launcher.

SOVIET KALASHNIKOV RPK LIGHT MACHINE GUN

In the mid-1950s, the Soviet army started trials for a new infantry weapon system to replace the 7.62 x 39mm SKS carbines, AK-47 assault rifles and RPD light machine guns.  Several designers submitted their designs that included both the assault rifle and the machine gun, basically the same weapon as the companion rifle but with a longer, heavier barrel and with larger capacity, but still with a compatible ammunition magazine.